discount Cool Beans: The Ultimate discount Guide to Cooking with outlet online sale the World's Most Versatile Plant-Based Protein, with 125 Recipes [A Cookbook] sale

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Unlock the possibilities of beans, chickpeas, lentils, pulses, and more with 125 fresh, modern recipes for globally inspired vegetarian mains, snacks, soups, and desserts, from a James Beard Award-winning food writer

“This is the bean bible we need.”—Bon Appétit 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Food Network • NPR • Forbes Smithsonian Magazine • Wired

After being overlooked for too long in the culinary world, beans are emerging for what they truly are: a delicious, versatile, and environmentally friendly protein. In fact, with a little ingenuity, this nutritious and hearty staple is guaranteed to liven up your kitchen.

Joe Yonan, food editor of the  Washington Post,provides a master base recipe for cooking any sort of bean in any sort of appliance—Instant Pot, slow cooker, or stovetop—as well as creative recipes for using beans in daily life, from Harissa-Roasted Carrot and White Bean Dip to Crunchy Spiced Chickpeas to Smoky Black Bean and Plantain Chili. Drawing on the culinary traditions of the Middle East, the Mediterranean, Africa, South America, Asia, and the American South, and with beautiful photography throughout, this book has recipes for everyone. With fresh flavors, vibrant spices, and clever techniques, Yonan shows how beans can make for thrillingdinners, lunches, breakfasts—and even desserts!

Review

Cool Beans . . . has been, by far, the cookbook I’ve cooked out of most this year. The book’s premise is a simple one: this food you thought was just ok, is actually really delicious, and really easy to make delicious in more ways than you likely thought possible.” —Daniel Modlin, The Daily Beast

“Joe Yonan’s obsession with the humble bean is a fascinating read. Creativity, passion, and knowledge are visible in every dish. From black chickpea hummus to red bean ice cream, each recipe is both surprising and completely achievable.” —Yotam Ottolenghi, author of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi Simple

“Where I come from in northern Spain, beans play a starring role in many of our dishes, so I am happy to see that Joe has cast beans as the lead in this book, showing us that they are capable of doing so much! Joe has always been a big thinker when it comes to eating better—both for our bodies and for our planet—and this book is a blueprint for reducing our meat consumption in a thoughtful and delicious way.” —José Andrés, chef and humanitarian

“Joe Yonan’s delectable Cool Beans is a collection of more than 100 very enticing recipes, all properly attributed to the source of inspiration. Aside from the recipes, there’s a great deal to learn in Cool Beans. This book should earn a place of honor in anyone’s kitchen. I know that it will in mine.” —Deborah Madison, author of Vegetable Literacy

“Joe Yonan has created the most fascinating and unexpected adventure into the world of beans. The best part is that you want to try every recipe, because he makes them easy, accessible, and irresistible. His knowledge, kindness, and sense of humor is such delightful company on every page. As you cook your way from soups to desserts, he also manages to open a window into fabulous cuisines around the world. He connects us all through an ingredient he loves. So excited and grateful for this book!” —Pati Jinich, star of Pati’s Mexican Table

“From the very first recipe in Cool Beans, you know you are in good hands. Joe Yonan’s collection of bean-based indulgences is hip without being pretentious, easy without being simple, and just plain inspiring, no matter how you eat. This book is a beautiful celebration of beans. It belongs in every kitchen.” —Steve Sando, founder of Rancho Gordo

About the Author

Joe Yonan is the two-time James Beard Award-winning food and dining editor of The Washington Post. He is the author of Eat Your Vegetables, which was named among the best cookbooks of 2013 by The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, and NPR''s Here and Now, and Serve Yourself, which Serious Eats, David Lebovitz, and the San Francisco Chronicle named to their best-of-the-year lists. Joe was a food writer and travel section editor at The Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit the Post''s food section. He writes the Post''s "Weeknight Vegetarian" column and for five years wrote the "Cooking for One" column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

“We’re just here for the beans.”

That’s what we told the waiter at Maximo Bistrot in Mexico City, where my husband, Carl, and I were honeymooning.

We had considered a handful of destinations, but CDMX was at the top of our list for several reasons: we had scored cheap nonstop flights from Washington, DC; Carl had never been and I was eager to show him just what he had been missing; and what he had been missing, more than anything else, was the food.

For me, the appeal goes even deeper: Mexico City is not just the capital of our vibrant, fascinating neighbor to the south. It’s the seat of a culinary culture ruled by three kings: corn, chiles, and beans. And as a longtime vegetarian who reveres beans as the most important plant-based protein in the world and as someone who grew up in West Texas, immersed in Mexican-American culture, I consider Mexico the bean-all and end-all. Every Mexican chef I’ve ever met has waxed poetic about them: scoops of frijoles borrachos (drunken beans) nestled in fresh corn tortillas; complex stews made from slowly cooked black beans, fresh and dried chiles and the pungent herb epazote; and smoke-kissed purees slathered on fried masa boats, topped with lime-dressed greens. It’s one of the many reasons I’ve always felt at home there.

This time, I knew that on and among our visits to the floating gardens of Xochimilco, Frida Kahlo’s and Diego Rivera’s homes and museums, street food tours, art galleries, and markets, I would be on a mission to taste as many bean dishes as I could find. And in my research, one chef emerged as the bean whisperer: Maximo owner Eduardo “Lalo” Garcia. I had heard that he was passionate, with a fascinating background, and that he served a spectacular bean soup at his tasting-menu restaurant.

We got to Maximo an hour before our reservation, just so we could talk to Garcia about beans, which, no surprise, are one of his favorite subjects. In addition to his history lessons about them, Mexican cooking, and the impact of NAFTA on his country’s culture, he described his “very, very old-fashioned” soup, made with beans he gets from the state of Hidalgo. They’re called cacahuate, because they resemble peanuts when raw, but . . . he was fresh out.

Out? I’m sorry, what? We had come all that way to see the master of beans in the world capital of beans only to be told . . . no dice, no beans. A young Los Angeles chef had visited just a day or two earlier, Garcia explained, and he had sent her home with the rest of his stash. I had a hunch: “Was it Jessica Koslow from Sqirl?” He nodded, laughed that I would, of course, know all the other American bean obsessives, and then, when he saw my face fall and recognized the depth of my disappointment, he turned serious. He started scrolling through his phone, I assumed checking emails, texts, or calendar reminders. Good news: He was scheduled for another bean delivery that weekend. He hadn’t planned it, but he’d make the soup for us—that is, as long as we would still be in town and could return.

We would, we could, and we did. A few days later, as we sat down for lunch—the only customers in the place getting just the bean soup rather than the multi-course tasting menu—the anticipation started nagging at me. How good could these beans actually be?

The waiter brought us two big bowls of soup: the beans were super-creamy and golden in color, fatter than pintos, with a broth that was so layered and deep and, well, beany, that it made me swoon. It seemed so simple—just beans and broth and pico de gallo—that I could hardly believe how much flavor I was tasting. My husband, still recovering from a bout of Montezuma’s Revenge, seemed to come back to life before my very eyes. We tore into a basket of blue corn tostadas, and I slugged a Minerva beer in between spoonfuls of the soup. We left happy and restored.

Such is the power of the humble bowl of beans.

As a category of food, beans are old, ancient even. Forward- thinking cooks have been talking about ancient grains for years now—my friend Maria Speck helped popularize the idea in her book Ancient Grains for Modern Meals—but some beans are just as old as grains. According to Ken Albala’s masterful 2007 book Beans: A History, among the first plants domesticated, some 10,000 years ago, were einkorn wheat, emmer, barley—and lentils.

Lentils are so old that people who say lentils are shaped like lenses have got it backward; the world’s first lenses got their name because they were shaped like lentils. That’s old. In fact, there’s evidence that thousands of years before they were domesticated, in 11,000 BC, people in Greece were cooking wild lentils.

Pythagoras talked about fava beans, Hippocrates about lupinis, and one particularly famous orator is even more deeply connected to chickpeas: His family took its name (Cicero) from the legume’s genus ( Cicer). Ancient Indian rituals and early Sanskrit literature feature mung beans. In the New World, the remains of beans were found in a Peruvian Andean cave dated to 6000 BC. Mentions of black beans show up in the writings of ancient Mayans. A little younger is the soybean, but it has made up for lost ground by becoming, as Albala writes, “the most widely grown bean on the planet, the darling of the food industries and genetically one of the most extensively modified of all plants.”

So why do beans have, well, something of a fusty reputation, especially here in the West?

I think a couple of things are going on: first, there’s the unavoidable association with hippies, the memories of three-bean chilis stirred by pot-smoking countercultural types. But perhaps more importantly, beans worldwide have almost always been associated with poverty. (An exception is India, where the prominence of vegetarian eating ensures that beans have been appreciated by the highest castes.) America, as a relatively young country built on grand ambitions and looking for inspiration, perhaps has historically paid more attention to the cooking of the world’s elite and less to the cooking of the more resourceful lower classes.

That’s been changing, thankfully. As immigrants continue to shape American cuisine and we pay more attention to our own native traditions, we’ve started to realize just how deep the roots of bean cookery go.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Food, Glorious Food!Top Contributor: Baking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can''t wait to dive face first into these recipes!
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2020
Just received this book today and had to write a review immediately. Its gorgeous! Joe Yonan''s book Cool Beans has a recommendation by Steve Sando from Rancho Gordo as "just plain inspiring" and that was good enough for me! I have Steves books too and only... See more
Just received this book today and had to write a review immediately. Its gorgeous!

Joe Yonan''s book Cool Beans has a recommendation by Steve Sando from Rancho Gordo as "just plain inspiring" and that was good enough for me! I have Steves books too and only purchase my beans from Rancho Gordo or from my local farmers market after repeatedly having issues with old, dry, hard beans in stores (even from Whole Foods) I have been cooking a lot of beans lately trying to amp up my plant protien and wind back on the meat. Even though I had a few bean cookbooks I purchased this one as soon as I saw it.

I never pay full price for my books. Well, when I say never I actually mean occasionally. When I just can''t wait for the price to drop on Amazon. But I am a cheapskate and I hate paying full price for anything but this book was one of those books I had to buy immediately.

So here I am, newly minted copy in hand, excitedly deciding what to make first.

Chapter list is as follows:
-Dips and Snacks
-Salads
-Soups, Stews and Soupy things
-Burgers, Sandwiches, wraps, tacos and a pizza
-Casseroles, pasta, rice and hearty main courses
-drinks and desserts
-condiments and other pantry recipes

Lets look at some of the recipes.....

-Dips 22 recipes including:
harissa carrot and white bean dip
spicy ethiopian red lentil dip
black bean sopes
corn hummus with spicy corn relish
ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche (see pic)

-Salads 14 recipes including:
red gem salad with green curry goddess and crispy lentils
lady cream pea, sweet potato and charred okra salad
winter salad with cranberry beans, squash and pomegranate (see pic)

-Soup etc 28 recipes including:
georgian kidney bean stew with corn flatbreads and pickled cabbage
smoky black bean and plantain chili
red lentil ful with sumac roasted
cauliflower (see pic)

-Burgers etc 17 recipes including:
chickpea tarragon sandwiches
black bean chipotle falafel burgers
yellow bean and spinach dosas (see pic)

-Casseroles etc 26 recipes including:
orecchiette with borlotti beans, bitter greens and lemony breadcrumbs
Tofu Migas with black beans and nopales
crispy hoppin john with smoked tofu

-Drinks and desserts (yes, really!)
13 recipes including:
Plantain, black sesame and white bean quick bread
chocolate, red bean and rose brownies (see pic)
red bean icecream (see pic)
salty margarita sour with aquafaba

-Condiments etc 6 recipes including:
chickpea aioli
coconut cashew yoghurt
herb marinated tofu feta

Joe Yonan is the food editor at the Washington Post. In Cool Beans he has provided us with global vegetarian bean inspiration. Many of you, like myself are either cutting back on meat or trying to broaden an already meatless diet and are looking at ways to increase our intake of plant protein. For those of us, this book is a must have! With loads of gorgeous full page photographs and 125 unique and delicious sounding recipes I am feeling pretty inspired. Please check back. I will update this review as I cook from this book.

A little about me:
I have been known to taste test 10 different soy sauces in one sitting (not sure I want to repeat that experiment)
I recently purchased 9 different lemon zesters just to determine which one was best (you can view the results on my profile page)
I enjoy writing reviews and this hobby of mine gives me an outlet to share my culinary explorations.
If this review has been helpful to you would you please click the helpful button? I like to think that my reviews help filter out the crap for other like-minded buyers who are hunting for the same products that I am :)
It makes my day to see that my kitchen insanity helped a fellow customer.
You might also like to visit my profile page and check out some of my other ingredient and recipe book and kitchen tool reviews and idea lists. You can also click to follow me on my profile page to be notified when I post a new review.
Happy cooking (and eating)
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James Dowdle
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too many recipes w/ no pictures.
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
First impression as we explore this book. We live in a visual world and cookbooks need to compare with digital competition. The photography is very good but there are too many dishes with no pictures. Estimate that only about 1/3rd of recipes have photos. Every picture... See more
First impression as we explore this book. We live in a visual world and cookbooks need to compare with digital competition. The photography is very good but there are too many dishes with no pictures. Estimate that only about 1/3rd of recipes have photos. Every picture does not need to be a full page. A smaller pic under the ingredients on the other recipes would have solved this issue. We are looking forward to trying some of these recipes but starting off a little disappointed.
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I Do The Speed LimitTop Contributor: Cooking
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Cool Beans!" An exclamation used to express approval and delight. So true with this book!
Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2020
"Cool Beans!" Surely it''s an expression to shout from your roof top once you start working with this book. Rather than write a review the day after the book was published, it took me somewhat longer to work with some of the recipes here and formulate my... See more
"Cool Beans!" Surely it''s an expression to shout from your roof top once you start working with this book.

Rather than write a review the day after the book was published, it took me somewhat longer to work with some of the recipes here and formulate my thoughts. I’ve still not covered all the recipes that I’ve got marked, but I’ve made up my mind that this is a very worthy book. And, hey, don’t forget to browse through the “Look Inside” feature on this product page. Ten Speed Press always does a great job of giving you, ahead of time, a good indication of the quality of the cook book you are considering buying. And, by perusing the contents and index pages, you can see the titles of all the chapters and most, if not all, the recipe names, plus see all pertinent ingredients.

At the top of your list, “Good Reasons to Buy this Book”: It’s by Joe Yonan, a personable and true journalist who’s been with the Washington Post for a long time and who is dedicated to communication, teaching and learning. Personally, as I have most of his other cook books, and as I try to keep up with his Washington Post articles, I knew this book would be full of great material. And it is. If you don''t believe me, and that''s not enough to make you want to buy this book on beans, keep reading.

IT’S ALL ABOUT BEANS! “COOL BEANS”! Those two words are an exclamation that will always remind me of my daughter, cause’ that was a favorite saying of hers during her younger days. So I felt a connection with this book before I even opened its pages. And, it’s JUST about beans and veggies, because Yonan has eliminated meat from his diet. So, meat eaters be aware: If you can’t picture your beans without a ham hock or whatever, you will need to add meat and meat flavorings to the ingredient lists yourself. And that’s a simple thing to do. (I’m saying these recipes can easily be adapted to accommodate those families and cooks that are leaning away from meat, but who have not eliminated it from their diets.)

I was happy to see the great variety of beans represented in these recipes. (Although I personally found a few too many chickpea recipes.) So if you are anything like me--with a few burlap sacks from Dove Creek (Adobe Milling) sitting picturesquely in a corner, nestled next to a wicker basket filled with the latest Bean Club order from Rancho Gordo, and another basket of lady cream peas, baby green limas and gorgeously-colored kidney beans from Camellia—this is a book suited perfectly for you. Hey, it’s a book for all bean lovers, and all those with favorites, as Yonan includes dried, fresh, and canned beans, peas and lentils in his ingredient lists. And he includes alternatives in his instructions and tips, too.

Okay, so for the past few weeks I’ve been cooking beans almost every day it seems. And the house is always fragrant with what’s on the stove. Yonan does provide instructions for cooking them on the stove like I do. But, more importantly, because I’m not in the majority anymore, and Yonan gives instructions for pressure cooking and multi-cooker and Instant Pot cooking. (He uses a pressure cooker, I believe.) He covers all the different ideas and techniques for cooking consistently perfect beans—soft and creamy inside and with skins intact and not tough. He mentions Rancho Gordo and ATK and individual authors and cooks when discussing techniques; brining, and using kombu, too.

And because this book has put me in the mood to cook multitudes of beans, having his chapters on salads and dips and snacks, plus his tips on freezing and storing, are preventing those cooked beans from building up in the frig. The dips in this book are so, so good—I’ll always be prepared for surprise visitors and healthy snacking with a few of these made up.

It still being wintertime, I’m delving more into the soup, stew, one dish and casserole recipes than into the chapter of salads. (Although there is a Christmas Lima, Kale and Tomato Salad that Ranch Gordo fans will be very happy with, and a Lady Cream Pea, Sweet Potato and Charred Okra Salad for the Camellia clientele.)

In my last Rancho Gordo Bean Club box, I got a package of a “prized”, hard-to-find, black beans called Santenera Negro Delgado. There is a very fine Smoky Black Bean and Plantain Chili. And if you need an introduction to using plantains (other than fried), this is the recipe to try. It will be a revelation! There’s another Cuban-Style black bean Stew-soup recipe with orange flavor, and that’s a great idea that I’ve not even seen in any of my Cuban cook books. But what I think is the BEST black bean recipe in this book? It’s the Salsa Madre, which they are calling “Black Bean Mother Sauce Puree”. And that is what I used my Santenera Negro Delgado beans to make. I will forever be grateful for the great timing of my Bean Club order and the publication of this book. It was an ideal opportunity to honor both the bean and the recipe.

I am a huge fan of Lady Cream Peas, fresh or dried. This one recipe alone--for Roasted Tomato and Pepper Soup--is worth the price of this book. I’ve salivated over many of the pictures in this book, but the idea of including Lady Cream Peas in a roasted tomato and pepper soup makes me crave it just thinking about it.

Oh, and speaking of pictures: For those of you who believe it matters, there is NOT A PICTURE for each recipe. There are 50 pictures of prepared beans, plus some other pictures of dried beans and beans cooking. There are about 125 recipes. Sure, I’d like to see more pictures, (especially for something hard to see in my mind''s eye, like the skewers of mushrooms and gigante beans), but I think a lot of bean dishes would start looking a bit too similar after a while. And I bet someone, soon, will post a picture of that satay somewhere…… Plus, if I had to choose between a picture and a recipe--I''d choose another recipe every time!

Some unusual and worthy recipes: A White Bean Brandade; Texas-Style Bowl O’ Red—beans, no meat; and a spectacular Show-Stopping Whole Roasted Cauliflower (on a bed of contrasting-color hummus), and Rigatoni E Ceci (with chickpeas).

Some simple, worthy recipes: Marinated Lima Beans; a vegan Southern Baked Beans; Spicy Ethiopian Red Lentil Dip; Chickpea Aioli, and a Salty Margarita Sour, (and plenty of info on aquafaba).

Some others worth noting, that I’d like to try before Spring arrives: Ratatouille Cassoulet and Root Vegetable, White Bean and Mushroom Cassoulet. There’s even a Chickpea and Quinoa Chorizo for those who strictly avoid meat.

I am very grateful to have this book now. There are not many good bean cook books out there, you know? And oftentimes—while I can make some pretty mouthwatering bean dishes with my usual basics (Working with great beans, how can you not make a great bean-based or one-bowl dinner?)—it still gets to be same old, same old. This book helps me out of that rut.
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N/A
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book isn''t about beans - its about vegan recipes
Reviewed in the United States on March 13, 2020
This book markets itself as being focused on beans and then it goes to great lengths to turn some of the best international bean dishes, from Ethiopia to France, vegan. It would be great if they offered the recipes, as they''ve been made for hundreds of years, with vegan... See more
This book markets itself as being focused on beans and then it goes to great lengths to turn some of the best international bean dishes, from Ethiopia to France, vegan. It would be great if they offered the recipes, as they''ve been made for hundreds of years, with vegan options, but they don''t. Complete waste of money if you are into authentic food.
67 people found this helpful
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Gary Bowden
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Book for Novice (or Long Time) Bean Afficianado
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2020
Joe Yonan''s recipes are easy to follow and accurate. His preface for the book is enjoyable to read and informative, as are the recipe introductions; each give you a sense of who Joe is and how he was inspired to write this unique book. As a cook just starting to integrate... See more
Joe Yonan''s recipes are easy to follow and accurate. His preface for the book is enjoyable to read and informative, as are the recipe introductions; each give you a sense of who Joe is and how he was inspired to write this unique book. As a cook just starting to integrate more beans into our diet, and who does not yet own an Instapot, I appreciate that Joe recognizes there are times when you can substitute canned beans or alternative beans that may be easier to find. The section titled "Bean Pantry" at the end is a great description of the bean varieties. As soon as the book arrived we made the delicious "Red Gem Salad" - rush to try this! And the "White Bean Brandade" was indeed a "warm and bubbly" (and delicious) alternative to a traditional cod brandade. The photographs will entice you to try many of these recipes and learn the benefits of the "musical fruit" (at least that is how I remember the age-old rhyme being told growing up in Ohio.)
45 people found this helpful
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Sheri L. Wetherell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must-have for bean lovers!
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2020
This cookbook has already found a permanent spot on our kitchen counter (and I''m a self-proclaimed cookbook addict)! Joe includes useful information about preparation, techniques, whether to soak or not, if you should worry about lectins (not) and why, and so much more. The... See more
This cookbook has already found a permanent spot on our kitchen counter (and I''m a self-proclaimed cookbook addict)! Joe includes useful information about preparation, techniques, whether to soak or not, if you should worry about lectins (not) and why, and so much more. The recipes are approachable yet unique and span the continents. It''s gorgeously photographed as well! It''s the perfect cookbook for the vegetarian or anyone who is looking to cook more meatless meals. Tonight we''re making the Red Lentil Ful with Sumac-Roasted Cauliflower, a spiced Egyptian tomato-based lentil and chickpea stew served with sumac-dusted cauliflower and drizzled with tahini. Delish!
21 people found this helpful
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DianaM
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Who knew beans could be so pretty?
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
I''ve been wanting to get on the "cook my own beans" bandwagon for awhile. I got an Instant Pot last year and even bought some Rancho Gordo cranberry beans...but they sat on my shelf, until this book! I was so excited to see a winter salad that called for cranberry beans, so... See more
I''ve been wanting to get on the "cook my own beans" bandwagon for awhile. I got an Instant Pot last year and even bought some Rancho Gordo cranberry beans...but they sat on my shelf, until this book! I was so excited to see a winter salad that called for cranberry beans, so I cooked them up, and made the salad, and it was delish! I served to friends who also liked it a lot, calling it "fancy fancy salad!" I love all the beautiful photos of beans in jars and have tagged so many recipes to try...like the hummus, and the coconut cream bean pie!
21 people found this helpful
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CHW in DC
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
On the road to a fulfilling plant-based diet
Reviewed in the United States on February 6, 2020
Over the years I have been try to transition to a plant-based diet for a whole host of reasons. The challenge for me has been to simply feel satiated. I always knew beans were the most logical options, but I lacked creativity in how to prepare them...until now. Yonan''s book... See more
Over the years I have been try to transition to a plant-based diet for a whole host of reasons. The challenge for me has been to simply feel satiated. I always knew beans were the most logical options, but I lacked creativity in how to prepare them...until now. Yonan''s book has introduced me to a whole new world of flavor and I love it. I''ve already started in on some of the recipes and look forward to working my way through the whole book (the photos are truly inspirational). This is a must-have cookbook for all!
21 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Lolamon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Legumes lovers delight.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 20, 2020
If you''re vegan, looking for inspiration, and love all kinds of legumes, this is for you. Worth every penny. Going to try growing my own beans this year, just so I can try some of the recipes. If you are based in Europe or UK, there are quite a few exotic...See more
If you''re vegan, looking for inspiration, and love all kinds of legumes, this is for you. Worth every penny. Going to try growing my own beans this year, just so I can try some of the recipes. If you are based in Europe or UK, there are quite a few exotic ingredients,(coconut aminos, peppers in adobe, dried ancho chillies, etc.), but many of these can be found in the bigger supermarkets now, health food shops, or on Amazon. There is a vital page in the first chapter that shows the categories of beans, and their substitutions. If you live in the US, it will be a lot easier to get many of the ingredients, I think. Still a brilliant book, from a brilliant writer, who generously credits many other chefs when he uses their recipes for inspiration.
7 people found this helpful
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Brad Q
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not my cup of beans
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 24, 2021
I was hoping for some nice, simple bean recipes. Instead, very complex recipes which i personally will never make. Not for a UK audience. Too American with too many ingredients one would never find in the UK.
One person found this helpful
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Gee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very interesting book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 26, 2021
Very interesting book - still reading it and haven''t tried any recipes yet but will do.
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RGS
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I would recommend this book for the dip section alone!
Reviewed in Canada on June 17, 2020
I have only had this book for a short time but already love it. I have made 5 recipes so far from this and loved each of them. The book is well written and the steps are easy to follow. The ingredients are easy to find and mostly cupboard staples. I love that he offers a...See more
I have only had this book for a short time but already love it. I have made 5 recipes so far from this and loved each of them. The book is well written and the steps are easy to follow. The ingredients are easy to find and mostly cupboard staples. I love that he offers a wide variety of possible beans you could use for most recipes if you have trouble finding some of them. I really love that he makes it easy to use canned beans in his recipes. I highly recommend this book and I''m not a vegetarian!
5 people found this helpful
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LMS
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Only for people with time and expensive equipment
Reviewed in Germany on December 9, 2020
I purchased this book because I''m vegetarian and need to get more beans and pulses into my diet. While the recipes in this book are thought-provoking, they''re totally impractical to cook; either because there''s lots of (not necessarily available) ingredients, because they...See more
I purchased this book because I''m vegetarian and need to get more beans and pulses into my diet. While the recipes in this book are thought-provoking, they''re totally impractical to cook; either because there''s lots of (not necessarily available) ingredients, because they require expensive equipment and pots, or because they take hours and hours to prepare. As such I would consider this book perhaps of interest for people who do not work or study, or whose job involves cooking. I do not think it is practical for anybody else. Very disappointed.
2 people found this helpful
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Description

Product Description

Unlock the possibilities of beans, chickpeas, lentils, pulses, and more with 125 fresh, modern recipes for globally inspired vegetarian mains, snacks, soups, and desserts, from a James Beard Award-winning food writer

“This is the bean bible we need.”—Bon Appétit 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Food Network • NPR • Forbes Smithsonian Magazine • Wired

After being overlooked for too long in the culinary world, beans are emerging for what they truly are: a delicious, versatile, and environmentally friendly protein. In fact, with a little ingenuity, this nutritious and hearty staple is guaranteed to liven up your kitchen.

Joe Yonan, food editor of the  Washington Post,provides a master base recipe for cooking any sort of bean in any sort of appliance—Instant Pot, slow cooker, or stovetop—as well as creative recipes for using beans in daily life, from Harissa-Roasted Carrot and White Bean Dip to Crunchy Spiced Chickpeas to Smoky Black Bean and Plantain Chili. Drawing on the culinary traditions of the Middle East, the Mediterranean, Africa, South America, Asia, and the American South, and with beautiful photography throughout, this book has recipes for everyone. With fresh flavors, vibrant spices, and clever techniques, Yonan shows how beans can make for thrillingdinners, lunches, breakfasts—and even desserts!

Review

Cool Beans . . . has been, by far, the cookbook I’ve cooked out of most this year. The book’s premise is a simple one: this food you thought was just ok, is actually really delicious, and really easy to make delicious in more ways than you likely thought possible.” —Daniel Modlin, The Daily Beast

“Joe Yonan’s obsession with the humble bean is a fascinating read. Creativity, passion, and knowledge are visible in every dish. From black chickpea hummus to red bean ice cream, each recipe is both surprising and completely achievable.” —Yotam Ottolenghi, author of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi Simple

“Where I come from in northern Spain, beans play a starring role in many of our dishes, so I am happy to see that Joe has cast beans as the lead in this book, showing us that they are capable of doing so much! Joe has always been a big thinker when it comes to eating better—both for our bodies and for our planet—and this book is a blueprint for reducing our meat consumption in a thoughtful and delicious way.” —José Andrés, chef and humanitarian

“Joe Yonan’s delectable Cool Beans is a collection of more than 100 very enticing recipes, all properly attributed to the source of inspiration. Aside from the recipes, there’s a great deal to learn in Cool Beans. This book should earn a place of honor in anyone’s kitchen. I know that it will in mine.” —Deborah Madison, author of Vegetable Literacy

“Joe Yonan has created the most fascinating and unexpected adventure into the world of beans. The best part is that you want to try every recipe, because he makes them easy, accessible, and irresistible. His knowledge, kindness, and sense of humor is such delightful company on every page. As you cook your way from soups to desserts, he also manages to open a window into fabulous cuisines around the world. He connects us all through an ingredient he loves. So excited and grateful for this book!” —Pati Jinich, star of Pati’s Mexican Table

“From the very first recipe in Cool Beans, you know you are in good hands. Joe Yonan’s collection of bean-based indulgences is hip without being pretentious, easy without being simple, and just plain inspiring, no matter how you eat. This book is a beautiful celebration of beans. It belongs in every kitchen.” —Steve Sando, founder of Rancho Gordo

About the Author

Joe Yonan is the two-time James Beard Award-winning food and dining editor of The Washington Post. He is the author of Eat Your Vegetables, which was named among the best cookbooks of 2013 by The Atlantic, The Boston Globe, and NPR''s Here and Now, and Serve Yourself, which Serious Eats, David Lebovitz, and the San Francisco Chronicle named to their best-of-the-year lists. Joe was a food writer and travel section editor at The Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit the Post''s food section. He writes the Post''s "Weeknight Vegetarian" column and for five years wrote the "Cooking for One" column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

“We’re just here for the beans.”

That’s what we told the waiter at Maximo Bistrot in Mexico City, where my husband, Carl, and I were honeymooning.

We had considered a handful of destinations, but CDMX was at the top of our list for several reasons: we had scored cheap nonstop flights from Washington, DC; Carl had never been and I was eager to show him just what he had been missing; and what he had been missing, more than anything else, was the food.

For me, the appeal goes even deeper: Mexico City is not just the capital of our vibrant, fascinating neighbor to the south. It’s the seat of a culinary culture ruled by three kings: corn, chiles, and beans. And as a longtime vegetarian who reveres beans as the most important plant-based protein in the world and as someone who grew up in West Texas, immersed in Mexican-American culture, I consider Mexico the bean-all and end-all. Every Mexican chef I’ve ever met has waxed poetic about them: scoops of frijoles borrachos (drunken beans) nestled in fresh corn tortillas; complex stews made from slowly cooked black beans, fresh and dried chiles and the pungent herb epazote; and smoke-kissed purees slathered on fried masa boats, topped with lime-dressed greens. It’s one of the many reasons I’ve always felt at home there.

This time, I knew that on and among our visits to the floating gardens of Xochimilco, Frida Kahlo’s and Diego Rivera’s homes and museums, street food tours, art galleries, and markets, I would be on a mission to taste as many bean dishes as I could find. And in my research, one chef emerged as the bean whisperer: Maximo owner Eduardo “Lalo” Garcia. I had heard that he was passionate, with a fascinating background, and that he served a spectacular bean soup at his tasting-menu restaurant.

We got to Maximo an hour before our reservation, just so we could talk to Garcia about beans, which, no surprise, are one of his favorite subjects. In addition to his history lessons about them, Mexican cooking, and the impact of NAFTA on his country’s culture, he described his “very, very old-fashioned” soup, made with beans he gets from the state of Hidalgo. They’re called cacahuate, because they resemble peanuts when raw, but . . . he was fresh out.

Out? I’m sorry, what? We had come all that way to see the master of beans in the world capital of beans only to be told . . . no dice, no beans. A young Los Angeles chef had visited just a day or two earlier, Garcia explained, and he had sent her home with the rest of his stash. I had a hunch: “Was it Jessica Koslow from Sqirl?” He nodded, laughed that I would, of course, know all the other American bean obsessives, and then, when he saw my face fall and recognized the depth of my disappointment, he turned serious. He started scrolling through his phone, I assumed checking emails, texts, or calendar reminders. Good news: He was scheduled for another bean delivery that weekend. He hadn’t planned it, but he’d make the soup for us—that is, as long as we would still be in town and could return.

We would, we could, and we did. A few days later, as we sat down for lunch—the only customers in the place getting just the bean soup rather than the multi-course tasting menu—the anticipation started nagging at me. How good could these beans actually be?

The waiter brought us two big bowls of soup: the beans were super-creamy and golden in color, fatter than pintos, with a broth that was so layered and deep and, well, beany, that it made me swoon. It seemed so simple—just beans and broth and pico de gallo—that I could hardly believe how much flavor I was tasting. My husband, still recovering from a bout of Montezuma’s Revenge, seemed to come back to life before my very eyes. We tore into a basket of blue corn tostadas, and I slugged a Minerva beer in between spoonfuls of the soup. We left happy and restored.

Such is the power of the humble bowl of beans.

As a category of food, beans are old, ancient even. Forward- thinking cooks have been talking about ancient grains for years now—my friend Maria Speck helped popularize the idea in her book Ancient Grains for Modern Meals—but some beans are just as old as grains. According to Ken Albala’s masterful 2007 book Beans: A History, among the first plants domesticated, some 10,000 years ago, were einkorn wheat, emmer, barley—and lentils.

Lentils are so old that people who say lentils are shaped like lenses have got it backward; the world’s first lenses got their name because they were shaped like lentils. That’s old. In fact, there’s evidence that thousands of years before they were domesticated, in 11,000 BC, people in Greece were cooking wild lentils.

Pythagoras talked about fava beans, Hippocrates about lupinis, and one particularly famous orator is even more deeply connected to chickpeas: His family took its name (Cicero) from the legume’s genus ( Cicer). Ancient Indian rituals and early Sanskrit literature feature mung beans. In the New World, the remains of beans were found in a Peruvian Andean cave dated to 6000 BC. Mentions of black beans show up in the writings of ancient Mayans. A little younger is the soybean, but it has made up for lost ground by becoming, as Albala writes, “the most widely grown bean on the planet, the darling of the food industries and genetically one of the most extensively modified of all plants.”

So why do beans have, well, something of a fusty reputation, especially here in the West?

I think a couple of things are going on: first, there’s the unavoidable association with hippies, the memories of three-bean chilis stirred by pot-smoking countercultural types. But perhaps more importantly, beans worldwide have almost always been associated with poverty. (An exception is India, where the prominence of vegetarian eating ensures that beans have been appreciated by the highest castes.) America, as a relatively young country built on grand ambitions and looking for inspiration, perhaps has historically paid more attention to the cooking of the world’s elite and less to the cooking of the more resourceful lower classes.

That’s been changing, thankfully. As immigrants continue to shape American cuisine and we pay more attention to our own native traditions, we’ve started to realize just how deep the roots of bean cookery go.

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